The Mexican state of Michoacán is located in the central region of Mexico, southwest of Mexico City.  The Day of the Dead is an important religious and cultural celebration, it said to be one of the most important representations of the living heritage of Mexico and the world, and one of the oldest and strongest cultural expressions of indigenous groups in the country.

Day of the Dead 

This central region of Mexico is heavily influenced by the indigenous culture of the Purepecha.  Town names reflect the language of the Purepecha and many cultural traditions are still observed, especially regarding the Day of the Dead.  One of the traditions that can be witnessed in the city of Morelia is the ringing of the bells.  The bells can be heard day and night during the days of celebration and many people consider the bells to be the voices of the town calling their souls home to guide in their travels and to help them to recognize their houses.

Altar 

In the bustling city of Morelia truckloads of bright orange marigolds- cempasuchil, make deliveries to construct the many altars that line public streets, parks and other public spaces.  Most families build altars for their departed loved one in their homes or in the cemetery, where they will await their souls return to celebrate together the one day of the year that the line between death and life is hazy enough that they can come together.

Day of the Dead 

In the heart of the historic downtown area of Morelia city lies the Plaza Morelos, where an amazingly huge altar is prepared to honor the traditions of the day of the dead.  One of the modern interpretations of the Day of the Dead in this urban juxtaposition of cultures is the Living Katrinas Exhibition, where young people enact different scenes of death living everyday life.  They are painted to look like skeletons and Katrinas.  The Katrina is an elegant representation of death as an upper-class lady skeleton that has become an icon of death in everyday life in mainstream Mexican culture.

Day of the Dead 

Dia De los Muertos 

Day of the Dead 

The many colorful altars and displays throughout this region of Mexico, for the Day of the Dead, are truly a treat to the senses and provides a loving outlet for remembrance our dearly departed.

 

 

 

 

Author:

Lisa Love Juliot Lisa Love Juliot walked across the California, Mexico border with a backpack and the intent to travel all of Mexico and Central America.  Eight years later, her journeys continue throughout the Riviera Maya and Yucatan Penninsula.  She currently resides in Playa del Carmen and spends her time exploring this magical area.   She enjoys working for BuyPlaya, a local Playa del Carmen real estate company as the Social Media Community Manager.  A long time blogger and travel writer, sociologist at heart and amateur photographer she is enthusiastic about Mexico travel and culture.  Follow Lisa on Twitter, Facebook/BuyPlaya and Google+ to find out more about her adventures, events in the Mexican Caribbean and information about living in Playa del Carmen.